Category Archives: Galveston District

Addicks and Barker construction update

GALVESTON, Texas (Oct. 29, 2015) – In the coming days, the public can expect to see construction impacts to the hike and bike trail system located at both the Addicks and Barker dams and reservoirs in Houston.

“Work will occur on the dams and areas adjacent to the dams that double as recreational sites such as George Bush and Bear Creek parks and our primary objective is to maintain public safety both by ensuring that the dams we own and operate are safe and that risks to the public are minimized,” said Natural Resource Manager Richard Long, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Galveston District. “We ask the public for patience while we replace the water control structures.”

According to Long, Granite Construction will begin preparing the area along the west side of the Corps’ Highway 6 parking lot at Buffalo Bayou, which provides parking and access for the Terry Hershey Park and the Barker Dam/George Bush Park hike and bike trails.

“Granite Construction will be installing temporary construction offices, clearing the vegetation in the area, removing three sidewalks (which serve the trail system) and installing fencing around the office perimeter,” said Long. “The public will no longer be able to use these three sidewalks however, the parking lot and public access to the trail system along the south end of the parking lot will remain available without change for the next few months.”

Long stated that even though access to the trail system will remain available on the south end of the parking lot, construction activities including the movement of heavy trucks and equipment in and out of the area will be occurring and caution should be exercised.

“The public should use extreme care while entering and leaving the parking lot with their vehicles and entering and leaving the trail system by foot or on bicycle,” said Long. “Additional changes to the trail system will be necessary as construction progresses and every reasonable effort will be made to inform the public in advance of these changes.”

The USACE Galveston District awarded a contract in the amount of $71,902,340 to Granite Construction Company for construction of new outlet structures at the Addicks and Barker Dams in west Houston. The contract was awarded in August 2015 and is expected to be completed in 2019.

The public is encouraged to contact staff at the Addicks Field Office at 281-497-0740. For additional information about the Addicks and Barker Dam Safety Program, please visit

 

www.swg.usace.army.mil; email addicksandbarker@usace.army.mil or call 409-766-3004 or find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GalvestonDistrict. For news and information, visit www.swg.usace.army.mil. Find us on Facebook, www.facebook.com/GalvestonDistrict or follow us on Twitter, www.twitter.com/USACEgalveston.


Army Corps of Engineers projects prevent $13.3 billion in flood damages during spring rains

Addicks and Barker Reservoirs, located near the intersection of I-10 and State Highway 6 in Houston, helped prevent $2.1 billion in flood damages during the recent spring rain event.
Addicks and Barker Reservoirs, located near the intersection of I-10 and State Highway 6 in Houston, helped prevent $2.1 billion in flood damages during the recent spring rain event.
Water flows over the spillway at Lewisville Lake near Dallas after heavy rains in the area in May. About 35 trillion gallons of rain fell across Texas alone in May, with heavy rains also in Oklahoma and Arkansas, putting Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs and flood risk reduction structures to the test.
Water flows over the spillway at Lewisville Lake near Dallas after heavy rains in the area in May. About 35 trillion gallons of rain fell across Texas alone in May, with heavy rains also in Oklahoma and Arkansas, putting Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs and flood risk reduction structures to the test.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers flood risk reduction projects in the south central and southwestern United States prevented an estimated $13.3 billion in damages to local communities and infrastructure during the May-June 2015 flood event, according to recent calculations by Corps officials with the Southwestern Division in Dallas. The most damages prevented were in the greater Dallas-Fort Worth area, where the figure stood at $6.7 billion. Closely following was the greater Houston area with $6.4 billion in flood damages prevented.

“The Army Corps of Engineers flood risk reduction infrastructure—constructed, operated, and maintained with our great partners at all levels—and the benefit that it provides to our nation came to the forefront during this year’s extreme rainfall event, and our structures performed as designed,” said Brig. Gen. David C. Hill, Southwestern Division commander. “The fact that more than $6 billion in damages were prevented in both the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston areas—the nation’s fourth and fifth largest metropolitan areas—underscore the very robust and tangible benefit this infrastructure provides, along with the other key benefits that our lakes provide throughout the region: hydropower, water supply, and recreation.”

May 2015 was the wettest month on record for both Texas and Oklahoma, and set numerous records throughout the region. Continuing rains from Tropical Storm Bill in June resulted in Army Corps of Engineers flood risk reduction reservoirs and other systems put through a rigorous test to hold the floodwaters and protect local communities and downstream areas.

The breakout for the $6.7 billion in the Dallas-Fort Worth area includes the following: $1.2 billion in damages prevented by the flood damage protection at Grapevine Lake; $2.5 billion at Lake Ray Roberts; and $2.4 billion at Lewisville Lake.

The figures for the $6.4 billion in the greater Houston area include the following: $4.3 billion in damages prevented by the Houston Flood Channel improvements (Brays Bayou and Sims Bayou) and $2.1 billion by the Buffalo Bayou reservoirs (Addicks and Barker reservoirs).

Additionally, the Arkansas River Basin projects (which include parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas) prevented approximately $350 million in flood damages. The Red River Basin projects (which include parts of Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana) prevented approximately $150 million in flood damages.

During this flood event, the Southwestern Division had 51 flood control lakes in flood pool and 23 in surcharge pool. Eight new pools of record were set. The Division was in an emergency operation status for two months, which was also the length of time that the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System was not navigable by industry. Corps projects sustained approximately $209 million in damages, much of that at its recreation sites on the lakes. The Southwestern Division covers some 2.3 million acres of public land and water across five states.

Estimating flood damages prevented is a multi-stage process that involves looking at the water level with the flood reduction project (dam or levee) in place, and where the water level would have reached if the dam or levee had not been built. Economists and hydraulic engineers looking at the damages occurring with the dam or levee in place versus no dam or levee in place calculate the estimated economic damages prevented.