Category Archives: Little Rock District

Half a Century of Dedication, Duty to Our Nation

Dr. Randy Hathaway, Little Rock District’s Deputy Engineer, recounts more than 20 years of dedicated to the Corps during Henry Hollins’ retirement ceremony in Little Rock this spring.  Hollins, seated next to his wife Eva Hollins, coupled more than 20 years of civil service with 30-plus years of active duty in the U.S. Air Force for a total of 51 years of total federal service.
Dr. Randy Hathaway, Little Rock District’s Deputy Engineer, recounts more than 20 years of dedicated to the Corps during Henry Hollins’ retirement ceremony in Little Rock this spring. Hollins, seated next to his wife Eva Hollins, coupled more than 20 years of civil service with 30-plus years of active duty in the U.S. Air Force for a total of 51 years of total federal service.

By Miles Brown
Little Rock District
Public Affairs Office

Retiring after more than 20 years of service to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is no small feat and deserves proper recognition for dedicated service. Retiring for the second time in a career that spanned 51 years of total federal service commands respect and admiration from most if not all who hear the story.

Henry Hollins, a facilities specialist for the Little Rock District, retired from active duty with the U.S. Air Force as a Chief Master Sergeant after 30 plus years of honorable service. For some that would have been a satisfying and fitting end to their full-time working days – but not for Hollins. He soon found a new way to serve our Nation.

He started his second career with the Corps in 1995 shortly after his retirement from active duty and never missed a step. According to Dr. Randy Hathaway, the District’s Deputy Engineer, from the moment Hollins started working in Little Rock he was constantly moving.

“One thing you could always count on from Henry was a smile and a good morning sir – if you could catch him,” said Hathaway. “He would move so quickly from one office to the next that it was almost like he was running all day. And I don’t remember a time when he used the elevators in our seven-story building – he always took the stairs.

“What I will forever remember about Henry is his attitude,” added Hathaway. “We could all learn a lesson about how to go about your work, your day and your life from the way Henry approached every task. He arrived every morning with a positive attitude and tried his very best to make everyone here feel important and valued.”

Hollins’ duties brought him in contact with almost every member of the District, and many expressed their appreciation and admiration for having known him over the last two decades and beyond.

One of the guests in attendance at this second retirement recounted his first meeting with then Chief Master Sergeant Hollins more than 25 years earlier.

Dean Erickson, Little Rock District’s Chief of Logistics, presents a crystal Corps Castle to Henry Hollins in appreciation for his service and dedication to duty.  Hollins served as the District’s facility manager for more than 20 years.
Dean Erickson, Little Rock District’s Chief of Logistics, presents a crystal Corps Castle to Henry Hollins in appreciation for his service and dedication to duty. Hollins served as the District’s facility manager for more than 20 years.

Retiring after more than 20 years of service to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is no small feat and deserves proper recognition for dedicated service. Retiring for the second time in a career that spanned 51 years of total federal service commands respect and admiration from most if not all who hear the story.

“Chief Hollins made a big impression during my early years as a second lieutenant,” said A.J. Brown, a District contract specialist. “He taught me how to be an Air Force officer and much more.”

Another guest attempted to sum-up Hollins’ life and career in one word, “honorable.”

“Henry conducts himself honorably in every aspect of his life and work,” said Sandra Easter, Chief of the District’s Contracting Division. “I believe he is the most honorable person I have ever met.”

When it was finally time for the man of the hour to say a few words, in typical Hollins fashion, he was humble and thankful.

“I want to thanks each of you for coming out today and making the last 20 years the most wonderful and memorable of my career,” said Hollins. “I had the privilege of coming to work every day with some of the best people in the Corps. Thanks again for your thoughtfulness. I will truly miss all of you.”

Many in attendance at Hollins’ final retirement ceremony and those who could not be in attendance wish him the best that life has to offer and a slower paced life – although most do not think he will ever slowdown.


Generating interest in Southwestern Division hydropower

The Beaver Dam power plant operates two main 56 megawatt turbines and one house unit. The revenue from power generation is returned to the U.S Treasury to pay for the purchase price of the dam and the generating equipment Operations and Maintenance.
The Beaver Dam power plant operates two main 56 megawatt turbines and one house unit. The revenue from power generation is returned to the U.S Treasury to pay for the purchase price of the dam and the generating equipment Operations and Maintenance.

By Jay Townsend
Little Rock District
Public Affairs Office

As the nations’ demand for renewable energy use increases, so does the strain on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ageing hydropower infrastructure, the largest producer of renewable energy in the U.S.

The Corps is the largest owner-operator of hydroelectric power plants in the U.S. and one of the largest in the world. They operate 353 hydroelectric generating units at 75 multipurpose reservoirs with a total capability of 21,000 megawatts. This capability generates about 24 percent of America’s hydroelectric power and represents approximately 3 percent of the country’s total electric-generating capacity.

In order to ensure the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa, Little Rock and Fort Worth district hydropower assets are reliable for years to come, the three districts, under the umbrella of the Corp’s Southwestern Division, have formed the Southwestern Division Regional Hydropower Governance Board

The governance board provides oversight of the region’s hydropower programs. The goal of the board is to seek the most effective and efficient processes to deliver power generation, sustain the infrastructure, execute operations and maintenance at the hydropower projects and sustain technical competencies.

Currently the board has established eight working groups to study specific facets of the hydropower program. Discussions range from staffing and succession planning to data acquisition and even hazardous energy. The board indentified common integral sub-programs of the overall hydropower program and charged the working groups staffed by regional subject matter experts with developing implementation plans for standardization across the region.

The board is using the Army’s risk management processes (e.g., monitoring, examination, and analysis) to decide where and when to invest in maintenance and repairs in order to assure safe operations and provide national economic benefits.

The electricity produced within the Southwestern Division is marketed by Southwestern Power Administration and is sold, at cost, to not-for-profit municipal utilities, military installations and rural electric cooperatives for use by the citizens of Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas.

The Fort Worth District operates and maintains three hydroelectric plants, containing a total of 6 units with a generating capacity of 101 Megawatts. All of the plants are located within Texas.

The Tulsa District operates and maintains eight hydroelectric power plants, containing a total of 22 units with a generating capacity of 584 megawatts. Seven of the plants are located within eastern Oklahoma with one located just across the border in Texas. These plants benefit approximately 2 million end users throughout Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas and Louisiana.

The Little Rock District operates and maintains seven hydroelectric power plants. The 27 units in Little Rock have a a generating capacity of 1,068 Megawatts, and enough generation to power up to 400,000 households. Six of the plants are located throughout Arkansas and one is located at Table Rock Lake in Branson, Missouri.

Corps hydropower plants provide the ability to respond to rapid fluctuations in the nations’ power grid caused by other intermittent renewable resources such as wind and solar power. These auxiliary support services provided by Corps hydropower plants stabilize the grid and are essential for the smooth electrical integration of other renewable energy resources.

The current makeup of the board puts both Tulsa and Little Rock District commanders as co-chairs of the board with the Tulsa District Commander serving as the Executive Director. Members of the board include representatives from all three districts with provisions for special advisors to be select from best qualified from all three districts.