Category Archives: Locations

Spotlight on USACE Galveston District’s Capt. Robert M. Burnham

Capt. Robert M. Burnham
Each Soldier in the U.S. Army plays a role in maintaining the nation’s security. For Army Capt. Robert M. Burnham, the economic strength of the nation remains secure, as he fulfills his role as an operations manager in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Galveston District’s Navigation Branch, managing dredging-related operations and maintenance projects along the Texas coast.

GALVESTON, Texas (Aug. 3, 2015) – Each Soldier in the U.S. Army plays a role in maintaining the nation’s security. For Army Capt. Robert M. Burnham, the economic strength of the nation remains secure, as he fulfills his role as an operations manager in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Galveston District’s Navigation Branch, managing dredging-related operations and maintenance projects along the Texas coast.

With nine years under his belt as an active duty Soldier, Burnham has spent the last year applying his expertise in engineering to help maintain more than 1,000 miles of channel, including 250 miles of deep draft and 750 miles of shallow draft, a task that allows vessels to carry critical commodities that contribute to the nation’s economic power. 

“I like working on projects that mean something and have a purpose. In the case of my navigation projects with the Corps, there are potential impacts to the local and national economies if we do not deliver,” said Burnham. “Knowing this keeps you on your game, and often times, thinking outside the box to keep projects moving forward for the benefit of the nation.” 

On any given day, Burnham can be seen working on a variety of dredging projects, including the Freeport Entrance Channel maintenance job and placement area containment dike raising, the channel to Victoria middle reach maintenance contract and Texas U.S. Coast Guard Stations maintenance project. He also works on rapid response contracts for hurricane season, ensuring the district is prepared to keep navigation channels open should a hurricane occur.

“I enjoy leading project delivery teams. As an Army officer, leadership has always been an inherent part of my duties,” said Burnham. “Planning, coordinating and executing is what I loved about commanding an engineer company, and it is no different leading teams in the Corps. There are always challenges, but pushing through them and seeing the fruits of your labor is a great feeling and just makes you want to do it again.”

Burnham says his most memorable moment with the USACE Galveston District was stepping on the government-owned hopper dredge Wheeler for the very first time. 

“Before then, I had never seen a hopper dredge in person,” said Burnham. “Having the opportunity to not only board the Wheeler, but to be a part of the planning to bring her to Freeport, Texas, was awesome.”

According to Burnham, working with the Corps as an engineer officer is considered a broadening assignment for his rank as an Army captain. 

“The idea is to have Army captains complete their key developmental assignments, which was company command for me, then send them to a part of the Army to broaden them and expand their knowledge base,” said Burnham. “In my case, I was incredibly lucky to be assigned to the USACE Galveston District. It has opened my eyes to the civilian component of the engineer regiment. Being able to manage civil works projects is an incredible learning experience that will carry with me as I move through my career.”

According to Burnham, he likes to be challenged. 

“Every single job I’ve ever had in the engineer branch has been tough and demanding, yet very rewarding,” he said.

Prior to joining the USACE Galveston District, Burnham spent a year in Korea as the chief of the Master Planning Branch for the Directorate of Public Works at Yongsan Garrison. He previously commanded the 362nd Multi Role Bridge Company in Fort Benning, Georgia.

Burnham earned a Bachelor of Science in business from The Citadel and a Master of Science in Engineering Management from Missouri Science & Technology. He’s earned multiple accolades throughout his Army career including, the Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal and two Army Commendation medals. 

In his spare time, Burnham enjoys to golf, fish and barbecue. He is married to his wife Raquel and has one daughter, Madelyn.


Fort Supply Lake utilizes solar power to save energy

The shower and restroom facility at Supply Park on Fort Supply received an on-grid solar power upgrade, July 21. The solar panels will offset electricity costs for the facility.
The shower and restroom facility at Supply Park on Fort Supply received an on-grid solar power upgrade, July 21. The solar panels will offset electricity costs for the facility.

By Eric Summars
Fort Supply Lake

The Fort Supply Lake Office of the Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is making waves when it comes to the USACE “Go Green Initiative” – solar waves.

The project installed 18 solar panels and an inverter to provide up to 5 kilowatt hours of electricity to power a toilet and shower facility at Supply Park Public Use Area, here, July 21.

“The photovoltaic system at Fort Supply Lake is the first of its kind in the region to be installed in cooperation with Northwestern Electric Co-operative, Inc,” said Don Underwood, assistant lake manager, Fort Supply Lake.

As an on-grid system, the panels will supplement electricity to one of the buildings in Supply Park Public Use Area and hopefully reduce energy consumption and utility costs.

This solar energy installation was made possible through the award of a sustainability project submitted through a recreation budget request for fiscal year 2015.

Inspired by an executive order to strengthen federal environmental, energy, and transportation management, the project is executing the goal of improving energy efficiency through sustainable, renewable energy resources.

“Long-term, our goal is to see Fort Supply Lake become the greenest project within Tulsa District,” said Underwood. “Pole mounted photovoltaic lighting has been in place for about five years on select boat ramps at Fort Supply. This year we added three more pole mounted systems, and we have added three more through the Defense Logistics Agency Purchase Place system. Ultimately all of the security lighting at Fort Supply will be powered by the sun.”

Another way Fort Supply is trying to decrease the use of resources is through the use of waterless urinals at one shower-toilet facility and by continuing the effort to replace all flush urinals at all waterborne facilities with a waterless design to reduce the use of water and electricity.

To date, the largest “Go Green” project at Fort Supply was the installation of a geothermal heating and cooling system in the lake office.

According to Underwood, all of the energy efficient items in place now have worked flawlessly.

“With the exception of the geothermal unit, these items have all been somewhat experimental and have proved to work extremely well,” said Underwood. “While the overwhelming majority of the effort has been geared towards smaller, more affordable items, project staff understands mountains can only be moved inch-by-inch.”

Seeing good results makes it easier for personnel to stay engaged and constantly examine new ways to improve energy and resource conservation efforts.

“Transitioning to conservation-friendly amenities takes time,” said Kathy Carlson, Fort Supply lake manager. “These efforts have been bolstered by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and sustainability funding outside the normal budget and likely wouldn’t have been possible otherwise.”

“Because of outstanding expertise and technical support from the Tulsa District Engineering and Construction Division, we were encouraged to jump at each opportunity to expand the conservation effort at Fort Supply Lake,” Carlson said, “And we intend to keep pushing for change in the way services are provided.”