Category Archives: Southwestern Division (Dallas)

Hispanic Heritage Month – Embracing, Enriching, and Enabling America

Brig. Gen. David C. Hill
Brig. Gen. David C. Hill – Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern Division

Each year, we observe Hispanic Heritage Month from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 to recognize their many contributions to our nation’s legacy. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for Hispanic Heritage Month because it is the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries—Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico declared its independence on Sept. 16, and Chile on Sept. 18.

This year’s theme, chosen by the National Council of Hispanic Employment Managers is: “Embracing, Enriching, and Enabling America.”

The theme invites us to reflect on Hispanic Americans’ not only embracing America and its culture but also bringing their own traditions, culture, language, values, work ethics and ideals to the vitality and meaningful legacy in our Nation’s cultural framework.

Hispanic Americans have long played an essential role in our country’s remarkable culture, heritage, and the building of this great nation. They also have a proud and distinguished history in the U.S. Army and Corps of Engineers.

The number of Hispanic Americans serving their country in the U.S. armed forces continues to grow. In 2010, Hispanics represented the third largest ethnic group among the nation’s 21.8 million veterans, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Within the Army Corps of Engineers, we have slightly less than 800 members of Hispanic descent, and around 100 within the Southwestern Division. They serve in a wide variety of positions, across all career fields and pay grades, both civilian and in military uniform.

This month the Army will reflect on the accomplishments of Hispanics Americans like General Richard E. Cavazos the first Hispanic 4-Star General and Brig. Gen. Carmelita Vigil-Schimenti the first Hispanic female to attain rank of general.  The Army will also focus on unselfish contributions like those made by Distinguished Service Cross recipient Cpl. Aristides Sosa, 65th Engineer Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, during the Vietnam War. Sosa purposely jumped on top of a grenade during the Tet Offensive to save a comrade.

One great example of the Hispanic American influence in our Army is the 65th Infantry Regiment. Based in Puerto Rico, the unit was the only all-Hispanic unit to serve during the Korean War. Nicknamed the “Borinqueneers” in honor of a native Puerto Rican Indian tribe, the 65th displayed true heart and valor during the Korean War. During a three-year period from 1950 – 1953, the unit participated in nine major campaigns, earning a Presidential Unit Citation, a Meritorious Unit Commendation, and two Republic of Korea Unit Citations. Individual unit members earned four Distinguished Service Crosses and 124 Silver Stars.

I ask you to share in this special annual tribute by learning and celebrating the generations of Hispanic and Latino Americans who have positively influenced and enriched our nation and society.


Preparing for the perfect storm

by Jay Townsend

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern Division hosted a hurricane training event in Galveston, Texas that brought multiple federal, state and local government organizations together to prepare for the next disaster and to rehearse how the unified response would play out.

Staff Ride

“Our objective here is to build and strengthen relationships among all the agencies through planning, training and exercises that allow transparency of our actions in the response and recovery stages of a hurricane event,” said Tony Semento, Chief, Readiness and Contingency Operations, Southwestern Division. “Disaster preparedness is one of the critical ways the Corps reduces risk to lives and property.”

EXERCISE, EXERCISE, EXERCISE

IKE08-notrackEight years ago Hurricane Ike slammed into the Texas Coast with sustained winds of 110 mph causing approximately $29.5 billion in damages. Ike caused severe flooding and damage from Galveston to Missouri.

Dardanelle Dam and Power House - Spring Flood 2015
Dardanelle Dam and Power House – Spring Flood 2015

In 2015, parts of Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas experienced the wettest May on record. It rained so much the Corps of Engineers Southwestern Division had 51 reservoirs in flood pool and 23 in surcharge pool. Eight new pools of record were set.

Now imagine those two storms happening simultaneously.

“It’s the perfect storm,” Semento said. “If a storm like Ike would have hit during the 2015 floods, SWD’s hurricane protection structures and reservoirs could have been pushed beyond their capabilities.”

Semento went on to say a scenario where almost all of the flood risk reduction reservoirs in the region are full or recovering from spring flooding followed by a hurricane could become a reality if the conditions are right in the future.

The two-day exercise started with a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter staff and media aerial tour. The tour was set up to show exercise participants the path of Hurricane Ike, Corps protection structures, flood risk reduction reservoirs, temporary housing and debris staging areas, key terrain, critical facilities, and also to get an idea of how the island and inland areas have recovered since the storm.

A view from the aerial tour. Addicks and Barker reservoirs provide flood damage reduction along Buffalo Bayou downstream of the reservoirs and through the center of the City of Houston. While the reservoirs are mostly dry today it was a different story earlier this year when heavy rains filled both reservoirs to new pools of record.
A view from the aerial tour. Addicks and Barker reservoirs provide flood damage reduction along Buffalo Bayou downstream of the reservoirs and through the center of the City of Houston. While the reservoirs are mostly dry today it was a different story earlier this year when heavy rains filled both reservoirs to new pools of record.

Media outlets were given a chance during the tour to discuss the exercise with Corps leadership as well as other agencies that participated.

Brig. Gen. David C. Hill, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern Division Commander interacts with a media outlet following an Army Black Hawk aerial tour of Galveston Island
Brig. Gen. David C. Hill, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern Division Commander interacts with a media outlet following an Army Black Hawk aerial tour of Galveston Island

Following the tour was a Hurricane Ike “lessons learned” round table. The round table gave agencies and individuals the chance to recap what it was like during the response and recovery period following Ike.

Hurricane TTX 2016 - Galveston

Many of the comments from the round table were about the limited living accommodations for disaster relief workers after the hurricane, the amount of debris that had to be removed from the islands and shipping channels, and how residents refused to leave their homes and belongings before and after the storm.

As the exercise continued and the simulated floods and storm worsened, each agency began to discuss their challenges and plans. This is when the information flow and interagency collaboration really got started.

For the next several hours each agency updated one another on their capabilities as the virtual hurricane hit land and moved inward. Multiple discussions popped up around the room about who was the lead agency in different situations and who was responsible for what.

These discussions were the type of “relationship building” conversations the event planners were trying to stimulate.

The scenario didn’t end after the storm hit. The virtual simulation continued on for several months. Mostly because the Corps and other agencies have cleanup responsibilities that will take years to finish.

At the end of the day SWD Commander Brig. Gen. Hill gave the “ALL CLEAR” and ended the exercise. Several folks were then recognized for planning the event and getting everything set up.