Category Archives: Southwestern Division (Dallas)

Knowledge Management awards recognize excellence, trailblazing efforts in Southwestern Division

John Davis, Knowledge Management Representative for the Southwestern Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is recognized as the Outstanding Knowledge Management Professional of the Year by Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, chief of engineers and commanding general of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for his commitment in advancing, advocating and implementing KM processing across SWD. The Division was also recognized as the Top Division/Center of the Year for its implementation of KM.
John Davis, Knowledge Management Representative for the Southwestern Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is recognized as the Outstanding Knowledge Management Professional of the Year by Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, chief of engineers and commanding general of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for his commitment in advancing, advocating and implementing KM processing across SWD. The Division was also recognized as the Top Division/Center of the Year for its implementation of KM.

The Southwestern Division and its principal Knowledge Management Representative, John Davis, are the recipients of top U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Knowledge Management awards for 2015.

Davis has been selected as the Outstanding Knowledge Management Professional of the Year and SWD the Top Division/Center of the Year for its implementation of KM, according to Corps officials. Cited for embedding KM in his daily workflow and encouraging knowledge sharing and learning, Davis was praised for a high level of commitment in advancing, advocating and implementing KM processing across SWD.

“Davis has shown exceptional collaboration across boundaries, networking, and mentoring abilities,” said Pete G. Perez, Director of Regional Business for the Southwestern Division. “His efforts have helped enable strong stakeholder relationships and improved cultural attitudes towards KM across USACE.”

The Southwestern Division award came for its role as an early adopter of KM, its excellence in the development and implementation of Discover SWD, the first USACE KM Business Case, and in advancing the Enterprise KM Program. Additionally, SWD’s impact to the Corps’ Knowledge Management has been substantial, demonstrating improvements in business processes, embedding knowledge sharing in the workflow, mapping and sharing knowledge for regional priorities in support of mission execution, thereby better serving both customers and stakeholders.

Through Discover SWD, employees are capable of sharing critical information and have means to share that information across the Division/District and the enterprise. Once employees are able to access new knowledge they can apply that knowledge to solve a problem, improve a process, or make a decision.

“Discover SWD provides the framework and environment for enhanced collaborations and connections,” said Perez. “Discover SWD is connecting people to people, people to content and gets the right information to the right people at
the right time.”

Brig. Gen. David C. Hill, SWD commander, added, “These awards are indicative of the trailblazing initiatives undertaken by John Davis and others within SWD. Knowledge Management is an integral part of our USACE Campaign Plan Goal 4, Prepare for Tomorrow, and supports SWD’s Regional Priorities. This well-deserved recognition will serve as an impetus to keep us on the KM trajectory for future success. Well done to Davis and the entire KM team!”


Army Corps of Engineers projects prevent $13.3 billion in flood damages during spring rains

Addicks and Barker Reservoirs, located near the intersection of I-10 and State Highway 6 in Houston, helped prevent $2.1 billion in flood damages during the recent spring rain event.
Addicks and Barker Reservoirs, located near the intersection of I-10 and State Highway 6 in Houston, helped prevent $2.1 billion in flood damages during the recent spring rain event.
Water flows over the spillway at Lewisville Lake near Dallas after heavy rains in the area in May. About 35 trillion gallons of rain fell across Texas alone in May, with heavy rains also in Oklahoma and Arkansas, putting Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs and flood risk reduction structures to the test.
Water flows over the spillway at Lewisville Lake near Dallas after heavy rains in the area in May. About 35 trillion gallons of rain fell across Texas alone in May, with heavy rains also in Oklahoma and Arkansas, putting Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs and flood risk reduction structures to the test.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers flood risk reduction projects in the south central and southwestern United States prevented an estimated $13.3 billion in damages to local communities and infrastructure during the May-June 2015 flood event, according to recent calculations by Corps officials with the Southwestern Division in Dallas. The most damages prevented were in the greater Dallas-Fort Worth area, where the figure stood at $6.7 billion. Closely following was the greater Houston area with $6.4 billion in flood damages prevented.

“The Army Corps of Engineers flood risk reduction infrastructure—constructed, operated, and maintained with our great partners at all levels—and the benefit that it provides to our nation came to the forefront during this year’s extreme rainfall event, and our structures performed as designed,” said Brig. Gen. David C. Hill, Southwestern Division commander. “The fact that more than $6 billion in damages were prevented in both the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston areas—the nation’s fourth and fifth largest metropolitan areas—underscore the very robust and tangible benefit this infrastructure provides, along with the other key benefits that our lakes provide throughout the region: hydropower, water supply, and recreation.”

May 2015 was the wettest month on record for both Texas and Oklahoma, and set numerous records throughout the region. Continuing rains from Tropical Storm Bill in June resulted in Army Corps of Engineers flood risk reduction reservoirs and other systems put through a rigorous test to hold the floodwaters and protect local communities and downstream areas.

The breakout for the $6.7 billion in the Dallas-Fort Worth area includes the following: $1.2 billion in damages prevented by the flood damage protection at Grapevine Lake; $2.5 billion at Lake Ray Roberts; and $2.4 billion at Lewisville Lake.

The figures for the $6.4 billion in the greater Houston area include the following: $4.3 billion in damages prevented by the Houston Flood Channel improvements (Brays Bayou and Sims Bayou) and $2.1 billion by the Buffalo Bayou reservoirs (Addicks and Barker reservoirs).

Additionally, the Arkansas River Basin projects (which include parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas) prevented approximately $350 million in flood damages. The Red River Basin projects (which include parts of Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana) prevented approximately $150 million in flood damages.

During this flood event, the Southwestern Division had 51 flood control lakes in flood pool and 23 in surcharge pool. Eight new pools of record were set. The Division was in an emergency operation status for two months, which was also the length of time that the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System was not navigable by industry. Corps projects sustained approximately $209 million in damages, much of that at its recreation sites on the lakes. The Southwestern Division covers some 2.3 million acres of public land and water across five states.

Estimating flood damages prevented is a multi-stage process that involves looking at the water level with the flood reduction project (dam or levee) in place, and where the water level would have reached if the dam or levee had not been built. Economists and hydraulic engineers looking at the damages occurring with the dam or levee in place versus no dam or levee in place calculate the estimated economic damages prevented.