Category Archives: Tulsa District

Dredging begins at Waurika Lake

Lieutenant Col. Daniel Young, deputy commander, Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, speaks during the opening ceremony for the Waurika Lake dredging project, November 3. Young praised the Waurika Lake Master Conservancy District for their efforts in dreding Waurika Lake to reclaim water supply and flood control storage.
Lieutenant Col. Daniel Young, deputy commander, Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, speaks during the opening ceremony for the Waurika Lake dredging project, November 3. Young praised the Waurika Lake Master Conservancy District for their efforts in dreding Waurika Lake to reclaim water supply and flood control storage.

TULSA – Dredging of Waurika Lake, to reclaim water storage for six southwestern Oklahoma municipalities began Nov. 3.
The dredging operation is the culmination of months of planning by the Waurika Lake Master Conservancy District, which requested approval from the Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to dredge the intake channel in 2014.

At the time of the request, the region was in a severe drought and Waurika Lake was 17 feet below the top of the conservation pool. Access to available water was limited by sedimentation in the intake channel which reduced the volume of available water supply in the conservation pool by 68 percent.

“We had to cut everyone’s water usage by 10 percent and we were on the verge of cutting usage even more before the rains in May and June,” said Jack Jackson, President, WMLCD, who has been a resident of the area since the 1950s. “We had never seen a drought that required those kinds of measures.”

The dredging operation will remove approximately 77,000 cubic yards of sediment from the intake channel that has built up since the impoundment that formed Waurika Lake began in 1977.

Waurika Lake was 20 feet below the top of the conservation pool when, unprecedented rainfall in May 2015 caused the lake to reach normal levels in only 22 days. The rainfall caused flooding throughout the Tulsa District, and prompted the Waurika Lake project office to begin flood control operations.

During the opening ceremony for the dredging operation, Lt. Col. Daniel Young, deputy commander, Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, praised the WLMCD for moving forward with the dredging project after the summer floods.

“Despite the return of water levels, the WLMCD decided to invest in the future of their water conservation resource,” Young said. “This project will remove nearly 77,000 cubic yards of sedimentation and improve the intake structures, reclaiming valuable storage space for Waurika Lake’s water conservation and flood risk management missions. You should be commended for your foresight and for your investment in the region’s water supply.”

The sediment is being pumped into a 17 acre containment area on WMLCD property.

Waurika Lake provides water to more than 275,000 people in six municipalities. In addition to water supply, Waurika Lake’s missions include flood control, irrigation, water quality, recreation and fish and wildlife.


Tulsa District celebrates Native American Heritage Month

Tulsa – The Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers celebrated the kick-off to Native American Heritage Month Nov. 2, with an event featuring tribal storyteller, Nelson “Scottie” Harjo and the Owasso Indian Education Dance Group.

This year’s national theme, “Growing Native Leaders: Enhancing Seven Generations,” is the cornerstone for all the month’s celebration activities. The theme embraces the ancient Iroquois philosophy that decisions that we make today should be sustainable seven generations into the future.

“We were very excited to put on the program today, because it not only showcases the diversity within our organization, but allows us to demonstrate the diversity within our own tribes,” stated Gloria Lowe, Tulsa District National American Indian Special Emphasis program manager.”

Approximately eight percent of the Tulsa District’s employees are American Indian.

There are 566 federally recognized tribes in the U.S., with Oklahoma being home to 38 of those tribes. Over 513,000 American Indians make their home in Oklahoma.

“Over the course of our nation’s rich and diverse history, American Indians have been an integral part of American culture and have made many lasting contributions,” stated Lt. Col. Daniel Young, Deputy Commander, Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. “They have left a legacy of selfless service and devotion to duty in defense of our nation and the freedoms we enjoy.”
Native American Heritage Month, celebrates the accomplishments of the Native American community and recognizes their contributions to the nation.

Prominent Native Americans include actor Graham Greene, astronaut John Herrington and most recently Keith Harper, who was confirmed as U.S. Ambassador to United Nations Human Rights Council in 2014, becoming the first American Indian ambassador.