Tag Archives: Heber Springs

Corps builds relationships during baseball game

Story and photos by Bryanna R. Poulin

Little Rock District, USACE Public Affairs Office

Summer is here and with more than 400 lakes and river projects throughout the United States, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is the leading provider in outdoor recreation and water related activities.

To kick off the start of summer June 8, members of the Little Rock District, USACE water safety team along with Bobber the Water Safety Dog headed to Dickey-Stephens park home to the Arkansas Travelers of the Texas Baseball League, sharing the importance of water safety to the public.

Russell Malahy, natural resource specialist, Little Rock District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, hands out toys during Clunker Boat Night June 8, 2017. The event allowed the Corps to reach hundreds of people and share water safety and the importance of wearing a life jacket on Corps lakes.

“It is part of the Corps mission to promote and educate the public on the importance of water safety,” Jeremy E. Wells, natural resource specialist, Little Rock District USACE said.

To promote the event, Wells along with other park rangers parked the Corps Water Safety Trailer and stood by the entrance giving away toys, cups and beach balls all bearing the Corps logo to people attending the Thursday night game.

 

Children received Corps toys and coloring books at Dickey-Stephens park home to the Arkansas Travelers of the Texas Baseball League, during the Little Rock Districts, USACE water safety event.

 

“An event such as this offers a great opportunity to encourage water safety to a large group of people all at one time,” Wells explained. “It’s important to get the water safety message out to the public because it can help save lives if they know to wear a life jacket.”

Most water fatalities result in people not wearing their life jacket and the game was the perfect opportunity to remind the public to wear life jackets while on or near water.

“We are always promoting the importance of wearing a life jacket because life jackets save lives,” he said.

Since there are many ways to have an accident on the water, the Corps program also promotes other safety measures.

John Bridgeman and Lisa Owens both natural resource specialists with Little Rock District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, speak to children of all ages during Clunker Boat Night June 8, 2017. The event allowed the Corps to reach hundreds of people and share water and life jacket safety.

“Our program also strives to identify life threatening concerns associated with water based recreation and increase public awareness of safe practices through interaction with our park rangers and educational media,” Wells said.

In addition to sharing water safety messages the event also builds and foster relationships between the Corps and the public.

 

John Bridgeman a natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, gives toys away to children of all ages during Clunker Boat Night June 8, 2017. The event allowed the Corps to reach hundreds of people and share water and life jacket safety.

“This is a great opportunity to interact with the local community and share the importance of water safety but it also allows an opportunity to visit with individuals one-on-one, whether it’s answering questions, addressing customer concerns, sharing information regarding recreational opportunities on USACE lakes or informing the public of the many other USACE missions in their community,” Wells concluded. “Additionally, the interaction helps improve the Corps relationship because it gives members of the public a greater understanding of who we are and what we do each and every day to make a difference in their lives.”

Russell Malahy, natural resource specialist, Little Rock District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, hands out toys during Clunker Boat Night June 8, 2017. The event allowed the Corps to reach hundreds of people and share water safety and the importance of wearing a life jacket on Corps lakes.

 

 

 

USACE employee uses childhood passion for lifelong career

As a young boy growing up on a 500 acre farm in central Arkansas, Seth Fisher, a natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spent most his childhood playing endlessly outside or in the woods.

From climbing bluffs to crossing rivers his grandparent’s farm was an endless adventure at his fingertips.

“My mom wasn’t like most moms since she let me do my own thing,” Fisher said smiling. “Of course I didn’t tell her everything I was getting into.”

In the eyes of a young child climbing bluffs or wading in creeks was like hiking a mountain or crossing a river.

“I would run inside and tell her all the things I had seen,” he said with a laugh. “How I crossed three rivers…there was some stuff I’m sure I left out because if she knew she wouldn’t let me go exploring.”

After years of exploring woods and being surrounded by nature eventually Fisher was inspired in a natural resources careers.

“Being young and growing up outside in nature made me want a job doing the same type of stuff,” Fisher explained.  “I knew I wanted to be part of a program allowing me to use my passion, but I didn’t know where to begin.”

Lacking clear guidance or goals, Fisher graduated high school and spent his first years in college not knowing what he wanted to do.

Seth Fisher, natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S Army Corps of Engineers conducts a school tour with a group of local children from Heber Springs, Arkansas on October 27. Fisher is a new employee with the Little Rock District and used his passion of the outdoors for a career in natural resources. The central Arkansas native spend his childhood on his grandparents’ 500 acre farm and knew during his adolescents that he would later grow up and work in nature.
Seth Fisher, natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S Army Corps of Engineers conducts a school tour with a group of local children from Heber Springs, Arkansas on October 27. Fisher is a new employee with the Little Rock District and used his passion of the outdoors for a career in natural resources. The central Arkansas native spend his childhood on his grandparents’ 500 acre farm and knew during his adolescents that he would later grow up and work in nature.

“I knew I wanted to work in nature and with kids,” he said.  “So I decided on a degree in wildlife biology.”

Although a recent graduate, Fishers first job wasn’t with USACE.

“I spent about six years employed at another organization before getting hired with the Corps last year,” he said.

However even as a new Corps employee, the position meant sacrifices for the Arkansas native.

“Getting a position with USACE meant my family and I had to move away,” Fisher said. “I worked with Vicksburg District for a year before getting the position here.”

Once offered a position more locally, Fisher didn’t hesitate to be able to stay with USACE so he could be closer to home.

“Coming here to this district brought my family to our home roots,” he said. “I’m only a couple hours from my parents now.”

Being close to his childhood farm is important to Fisher who is a new dad.

“Being a new father and also a husband I wanted to be close to where I grew up,” he said. “When I was with Vicksburg District I worked in Mississippi and couldn’t go home every weekend like I can now.”

“We [USACE] do things with kids, help the visitor center, shoreline management, and food plots,” he said.

Yet the most rewarding part of being a natural resource specialist, he feels, is the involvement and interaction with kids.

Seth Fisher, natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S Army Corps of Engineers conducts a school tour with a group of local children from Heber Springs, Arkansas on October 27. Fisher is a new employee with the Little Rock District and used his passion of the outdoors for a career in natural resources. The central Arkansas native spend his childhood on his grandparents’ 500 acre farm and knew during his adolescents that he would later grow up and work in nature.
Seth Fisher, natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S Army Corps of Engineers conducts a school tour with a group of local children from Heber Springs, Arkansas on October 27. Fisher is a new employee with the Little Rock District and used his passion of the outdoors for a career in natural resources. The central Arkansas native spend his childhood on his grandparents’ 500 acre farm and knew during his adolescents that he would later grow up and work in nature.

“Working with kids is my favorite part of this job,” he said.  “Combined with being outside brings me back to my childhood days of exploring in the woods.”

While Fisher plays a vital role in keeping Greers Ferry running, his teammates keep Fisher encouraged.

”The people who work here are professional and do their job well,” he said.  “They inspire me be better at my job.”

Fisher emphasized further it’s the kids who truly promote USACE and the importance of outdoor recreation.

“The kids come out and see what the Corps does,” he said.  “It gets them out in nature and allows hands on learning.”

Seth Fisher, natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S Army Corps of Engineers conducts a school tour with a group of local children from Heber Springs, Arkansas on October 27. Fisher is a new employee with the Little Rock District and used his passion of the outdoors for a career in natural resources. The central Arkansas native spend his childhood on his grandparents’ 500 acre farm and knew during his adolescents that he would later grow up and work in nature.
Seth Fisher, natural resource specialist with Little Rock District U.S Army Corps of Engineers conducts a school tour with a group of local children from Heber Springs, Arkansas on October 27. Fisher is a new employee with the Little Rock District and used his passion of the outdoors for a career in natural resources. The central Arkansas native spend his childhood on his grandparents’ 500 acre farm and knew during his adolescents that he would later grow up and work in nature.

While kids are getting a hands on approach it also keeps them excited to come back.

“When they [children] come out here and have fun they look forward to next year’s field trips,” Fisher said.  “We’re paving the way for future generations to be involved and know about the Corps.”